Tuesday, May 27, 2014

BODY ART #13: Anthropométries by Yves Klein

We continue to introduce some artists who have chosen to use the body (often their body) as the "canvas" or the "marble" on which express their creativity or pulsions.

This is an important branch of contemporary art that has its roots in the nature of human being and in the desire to modify the body or to show on it signs that link the person to a wider reality (community, culture, gods, myth...).


Among the artists we represent, it's sure that Rabarama art is influenced by the attention and focus on the body. She has her peculiar view on the theme and she is agile in changing the subjet to object in a big game of mutation: she could create on her body, with her body, on stone or metal bodies, on others' bodies.

In this way the subject is present but fades in a different concept of individuality, merging with the billions of possibilities of reality.

In August, 2014, she will be the protagonist of the RABARAMA BODY ART FESTIVAL, more information here www.rabaramabodyartfestival.com



BODY ART #13: Anthropométries by Yves Klein


 Anthropométries by Yves Klein

Despite the IKB paintings being uniformly coloured, Klein experimented with various methods of applying the paint; firstly different rollers and then later sponges, created a series of varied surfaces. This experimentalism would lead to a number of works Klein made using naked female models covered in blue paint and dragged across or laid upon canvases to make the image, using the models as "living brushes". This type of work he called Anthropometry. Other paintings in this method of production include "recordings" of rain that Klein made by driving around in the rain at 70 miles per hour with a canvas tied to the roof of his car, and canvases with patterns of soot created by scorching the canvas with gas burners.


Anthropométries by Yves Klein

Klein and Arman were continually involved with each other creatively, both as Nouveaux Réalistes and as friends. Both from Nice, the two worked together for many years and Arman even named his son, Yves Arman after Yves Klein who was his god-father.

Sometimes the creation of these paintings was turned into a kind of performance art—an event in 1960, for example, had an audience dressed in formal evening wear watching the models go about their task while an instrumental ensemble played Klein's 1949 The Monotone Symphony (a single 20-minute sustained chord followed by a 20-minute silence).


Anthropométries by Yves Klein
In the performance piece, Zone de Sensibilité Picturale Immatérielle (Zones of Immaterial Pictorial Sensibility) 1959–62, he offered empty spaces in the city in exchange for gold. He wanted his buyers to experience The Void by selling them empty space. In his view this experience could only be paid for in the purest material: gold. In exchange, he gave a certificate of ownership to the buyer. As the second part of the piece, performed on the Seine with an Art critic in attendance, if the buyer agreed to set fire to the certificate, Klein would throw half the gold into the river, in order to restore the "natural order" that he had unbalanced by selling the empty space (that was now not "empty" anymore). He used the other half of the gold to create a series of gold-leafed works, which, along with a series of pink monochromes, began to augment his blue monochromes toward the end of his life.



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